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Is it Ofcourse or Of course

waqas

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Before I start addressing my query let me make it apparent that I am not a native English speaker. This may sound stupid to some of you but please I would appreciate a clarification on the matter. Recently I was drafting some scripts for a play that was about to be performed in my local arts council. Now I use Microsoft Word 2010 as my word processing software and when a dialogue required the use of the word "Ofcourse" it started showing the red curly underline implying that I had made a spelling error, heck it's even showing in confab's editor right now :(.

So my question to you all is simple: Is "ofcourse" a legal English word or not ? I mean I have heard it plenty of times in different movies, plays etc that "Ofcourse" is a kind of an affirmation to a stated fact and mostly it is used as "Yes! Ofcourse" by the British. Can you guys tell me if I am spelling it wrong or does the word doesn't exist at all in the English vocabulary.

I also would like to know that whether "ofcourse" is written as "of course"? (with a space). If so doesn't that change the meaning of the word itself. I mean course is a set path or direction while using "of" before it could me deviation from the prescribed course? right? Whatever the case I really need some help on the matter.

Cheers
Waqas
 
The term "of course" is TWO words, never one.
Just as the term "a lot" is two words. SO MANY PEOPLE here write "a lot" as "alot" and it drives me batty. You cannot find ofcourse or alot in the dictionary because they are not proper words. There's the link for you, @waqas, which may help you.
 
As Smooth said, of course is two words, and never one. I've never seen the use of ofcourse until now, but alot I see a lot!
Alot is one of my pet hates, just like defiantly and definately instead of definitely, or collage instead of college... :whoa:
 
just like defiantly and definately instead of definitely, or collage instead of college... :whoa:

Oh, HELL YES. I can't stand it when those words are mixed up!!! People don't seem to even care that not knowing how to spell the proper words makes them look like MORONS. Typos are one thing; these that you've listed, Han, are not typos when they are used all the time!! If you can't remember your 5th grade spelling, you don't belong posting in public.
And technology just makes it worse! If the computer you're on doesn't automatically correct your typing, it must be correct the way it is! SO wrong. Technology is making us lazy and stupid.
 
Oh God, I know. I used to rage on Facebook all of the time because people would constantly be writing things like 'defiantly cant be bothered to go to collage today' and I'd reply with things like 'Whether you can be bothered to go or not, you definitely* need to go to college* to learn your basic spelling'. Sometimes I'd rage so much it'd be rude but so many people done it and ajskdalldhfsdkfd.
 
And here I thought I was the only one who did that. I WAS rude, intentionally. I think folks would get pissed because they felt stupid for having their ignorance pointed out.
Do they refer to you as a "grammar Nazi" too, Han? People making excuses and trying to be all "PC", insisting that it doesn't really matter. Well, it DOES matter. We're becoming more ignorant by the nano-second and it's not "ok". Not to me, it isn't.
Obviously, [MENTION=1848]waqas[/MENTION], when English isn't your first language, some of these mistakes can be overlooked. At least you are trying to learn the proper way to use and write the language!!
 
Similarly, on the "ofcourse/of course" discussion, I often see people using "offcourse" which is still wrong. Correct form would be "off-course" and it bugs the hell out of me. Same for alot and a lot. Alot isn't a word; allot is.

I have to be honest though, I often find people who aren't native English speakers are better at speaking the language than people born and raised here. It depresses me.
 
Do they refer to you as a "grammar Nazi" too, Han? People making excuses and trying to be all "PC", insisting that it doesn't really matter. Well, it DOES matter. We're becoming more ignorant by the nano-second and it's not "ok". Not to me, it isn't.

Hell yeah! To top it off, I also loved my history lessons on Nazi Germany. Hitler intrigues me. :eek:
I have so many people saying 'it dont matter its only the internet' - just because society is moving towards a more technology-based culture, does not mean that basic skills do not apply.
 
Another one that is really common and drives me batshit worse than most is people writing "could OF" or should OF" instead of "could HAVE" or "should HAVE". Just look at the contraction! It's not "could'of". That one is just wrong in so many ways and frankly, when the "of" is used it makes the author look way more than stupid. I HATE that one. *beating head against wall*
 
I have to do this.
Oh God, I know. I used to rage on Facebook all of the time because people would constantly be writing things like 'defiantly cant be bothered to go to collage today' and I'd reply with things like 'Whether you can be bothered to go or not, you definitely* need to go to college* to learn your basic spelling'. Sometimes I'd rage so much it'd be rude but so many people done it and ajskdalldhfsdkfd.
Did*

You are a traitor to this language madam.
 
Maybe she forgot the "have" to make it "have done it" or it was intentionally written to make a point like the jibberish at the end?? *shrug* Trying to help you out, [MENTION=1403]Han[/MENTION]! :D
 
istrongly believe is of course
spideytobey3.jpeg
 
I have to be honest though, I often find people who aren't native English speakers are better at speaking the language than people born and raised here. It depresses me.
This can be said for a lot of languages. The problem is, in England we don't really 'learn' English. Yes, we're taught some rules when we're younger but I've never once been told the difference between 'to' and 'too', it's frustrating. However, when we learn Spanish, we learn how to speak/write it correctly. We don't learn Spanish 'slang' so some English people can probably speak better Spanish than the Spanish do.
 
This can be said for a lot of languages. The problem is, in England we don't really 'learn' English. Yes, we're taught some rules when we're younger but I've never once been told the difference between 'to' and 'too', it's frustrating. However, when we learn Spanish, we learn how to speak/write it correctly. We don't learn Spanish 'slang' so some English people can probably speak better Spanish than the Spanish do.

You might want to find a new institute for your education - or listen more in your English lessons. Just because we speak the language does not mean that we know the rules and how to write it - that's why spelling and basic grammar and punctuation lessons are taught. Throughout the majority of my education that I remember, we were pounded with these basic skills. Irritating and boring when you do know them, yes. But I'd rather endure a lesson about things I know several times if it means others are going to be closer to using the language correctly/use it correctly.
 
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